SEARCHING: IACS



C01 Advances in Modelling Glaciers and Ice Caps – Past Reconstructions, Future Projections, and Process-Based Studies

Convener(s): Daniel Farinotti (Switzerland)

Co-Convener(s): Yongmei Gong (Norway) Mathieu Morlighem (USA) Harry Zekollari (Switzerland)

Description
"Mountain glaciers and ice caps are important freshwater resources, contribute significantly to present-day sea level rise, and can be a significant source of hazard. Numerical models of glaciers and ice caps are needed to understand past changes, to project future evolutions, and to quantify associated impacts. This symposium focuses on all aspects of modelling glaciers and ice caps other than the ice sheets, including but not limited to the following topics:
- Coupling of glacier mass balance models with ice flow models;
- Integration of physical processes, such as subglacial drainage or glacier calving, into existing models;
- Inverse modelling of subsurface characteristics;
- Inference of glacier ice thickness from surface measurements.
Studies on all spatial and temporal scales, including past reconstructions and future projections are solicited, with particular emphasis on regional-scale studies and high-mountain environments. "

Solicited Speaker: František Barac

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C02 Glacier Changes in High Mountain Asia and the Karakoram Anomaly: Latest Insights From the Atmosphere and Cryosphere

Convener(s): Frank Paul (Switzerland)

Co-Convener(s): Emily Collier (Austria) Daniel Farinotti (Switzerland) Pankaj Kumar (India)

Description
Snow cover and glacier changes in High Mountain Asia (HMA) have been intensely studied over the past two decades, mostly using satellite data, numerical models, and an increasing number of field observations. The interest in the region is high, as snow and glacier melt are of high importance for the water resources of millions of people living downstream of major mountain ranges. Of similar interest are the still poorly understood reasons for the high spatial variability of cryospheric changes, and amongst these, the so-called ‘Karakoram Anomaly’ is of particular interest. Marking a region with stable or advancing (and often surging) glaciers, balanced mass budgets, and decreasing (summer) temperatures, the glacier evolution in the Karakoram is in stark contrast to the strong retreat and mass loss observed elsewhere in HMA and most other glacierized regions on earth. With limited availability of temperature and precipitation observations, an extremely steep and high topography, a strong influence of the monsoon and westerly climate regimes, and nearly absent glacier mass balance measurements, our understanding of the governing processes are still vague. The combination of atmospheric and glaciological modelling with remote sensing observations has a great potential to improve our knowledge, and further progress is required if the future of the cryosphere and the water cycle are to be predicted correctly. For this symposium, we invite contributions reporting on the latest findings on cryospheric and atmospheric changes in HMA. We invite contributions based on remote sensing observations, field surveys or numerical modelling. We envision a special focus on the Karakoram Anomaly, but invite contributions from nearby regions as well. We particularly welcome studies that synergistically combine atmospheric and cryospheric modelling with remote sensing data or studies that investigate possible drivers of observed changes.



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C03 Debris Covered Glaciers

Convener(s): Francesca Pellicciotti (Switzerland)

Co-Convener(s): David Rounce (USA) Mike McCarthy (Switzerland) Lindsey Nicholson (Austria)

Description
Rock debris accumulating on glacier surfaces alters glacier energy balance, melt, mass balance and ice dynamics. The structure of debris cover is unique to each glacier and sensitive to climate, and an ever-growing body of research has embraced this complexity by looking at debris and its effects across scales. Research on debris-ice interactions spans point scale observations and simulations to mapping efforts at regional and global scales. While we are increasingly able to model ice melt under a static debris layer, and the knock-on effects of this for mass balance and ice dynamics, simulating the transit of debris through a glacier from its supply slopes is a major challenge, and debris remobilisation on the glacier surface remains elusive. The role of debris in the hydrology of single glaciers and entire catchments remains little understood. Despite advances in our understanding of surface processes, mass balance, hydrology, dynamics and long-term evolution of debris-covered glaciers, many open questions remain. This session aims to bring together results from numerical modelling, field observations and remote sensing to understand debris-ice interactions across scales. We invite contributions that include: i) the formation, characteristics and movement of supraglacial debris, including debris supply (e.g. headwall and subglacial erosion, avalanching), transport (englacial and supraglacial) and export; ii) studies of debris-covered glacier energy and mass balance, including at surface features such as supraglacial ponds and ice cliffs; iii) the hydrology of debris-covered glaciers and debris’ role in altering catchment hydrographs at annual to decadal scales; iv) debris-covered glacier dynamics; v) remote-sensing observations and numerical modelling of debris-covered glaciers and prediction of their changes in response to future climate forcing; vi) long term evolution of debris-covered glaciers and reconstructions of former glaciers; and vii) hazards associated with debris-covered glaciers such as glacial lake outburst floods and debris flows.



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C04 Fast Glacier Flow: Processes, Observations and Modelling of Ice Streams, Tidewater Glaciers and Surging Glaciers

Convener(s): Christine Hvidberg (Denmark)

Co-Convener(s): Ralf Greve (Japan) Ronja Reese (UK)

Description
Fast flowing ice streams and glaciers are important in maintaining the overall mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, yet the conditions that facilitate and regulate their fast flow remain poorly understood. The mechanics that govern fast flow and surging appear to be very responsive to changing conditions in the subglacial environment and at the front with effects on the whole glacier system. This symposium welcomes contributions from studies of ice streams, tidewater glaciers and surging glaciers, including the subglacial hydrology, shear margin processes, grounding line dynamics, the buttressing role of ice shelves and floating tongues, calving, the influence of surface meltwater and lake drainage, and other ice deformation and mechanical studies related to fast flow. Process studies, observations and/or numerical modelling investigations are all welcome.



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C05 Tropical Glaciers: Mass Changes, Climate Forcing and Impacts on Indigenous Communities

Convener(s): Nicolas Cullen (New Zealand)

Co-Convener(s): Jean Emmanuel Sicart (France) Thomas Mölg (Germany) Rainer Prinz (Austria) Marion Réveillet (France)

Description
"The recent changes to tropical glaciers have been dramatic and, given their importance to ecosystems, agriculture, freshwater, energy production and local communities, it remains critical that we continue to assess their sensitivity to climate change. This symposium will focus on the latest efforts and techniques to detect recent changes to tropical glaciers using observations, atmospheric and glaciological modelling and remote sensing, as well as recognising the importance of local, indigenous knowledge to understand the impact of these changes over different spatial and temporal scales. Topics may include but are not limited to:
- glacier energy and mass balance and their linkages to climate variability and change in the tropics
- the importance of atmospheric and climate dynamics in controlling tropical glaciers
- assessment of changes in the area and hypsometry of tropical glaciers using historical archives and/or integrating field-based observations with remote sensing
- reconstruction of tropical climate from ice cores and other natural archives
- the effects of mass changes on hazards and water resources and related natural and socio-economic systems in the recent past, present and future
- using indigenous knowledge to understand how changes to tropical glaciers are impacting people and the landscape We especially welcome contributions that integrate local, indigenous knowledge with observations, modelling and remote sensing."



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C06 New Frontiers in Paleoclimate Reconstructions and Proxy Interpretations From Ice Cores

Convener(s): Ji-Woong Yang (France)

Co-Convener(s): Mathieu Casado (France) Barbara Stenni (Italy) Christo Buizert (USA)

Description
The last IPCC report highlighted remaining large uncertainties in the future evolution of the cryosphere with direct consequences on global sea level rise. Understanding past climate variability and sensitivity from glacial archives is thus fundamental for placing the current changes in a longer-term context. The scientific ice core community is currently putting an enormous effort towards (1) retrieving the oldest continuous ice core from Antarctica (Project Beyond EPICA) and (2) training a new generation of ice core scientists capable of analysing, interpreting, and modelling the new records that will be obtained (ITN DEEPICE project). In addition, the ice cores retrieved in high-altitude/low-latitude glaciers are offering a wealth of paleoclimate information covering the last centuries and millennia, preserved in what is called the third pole. We invite contributions reporting new results or data/model studies related to ice cores drilled in both polar regions and mid-low latitude glaciers and covering temporal scales spanning from the last decades to glacial-interglacial cycles. Contributions presenting novel techniques for (1) advances in new proxies and increasing temporal resolution, (2) interpreting the paleoclimate records with new statistical techniques, (3) understanding the post-depositional processes potentially affecting the integrity of the records as well as new tools for (4) dating and (5) modelling paleoclimatic signals are welcomed.



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C07 Mass Changes of The Cryosphere – The Need for and Lessons Learned From Intercomparison Exercises

Convener(s): Michael Zemp (Switzerland)

Co-Convener(s): Kari Luojus (Finland) Julienne Stroeve (USA) Annett Bartsch (Austria) Inès Otosaka (UK)

Description
Climate change has strongly impacted the Earth’s cryosphere over the past decades. These changes strongly affect the planetary radiative forcing, global sea level, oceanic conditions, atmospheric circulation, and freshwater resources. Satellite observations have pushed the monitoring of the cryosphere and resulted in numerous global estimates of changes in ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice, snow, and permafrost. However, the latest IPCC assessment reports (IPCC SROCC and AR6) highlighted the shortcomings of the current methods: while an increasing number of estimates are now becoming available from various sources, there are large variations between some of these assessments, beyond stated uncertainties. This call for coordinated intercomparison exercises of mass-change estimates derived from various remote sensing sources for each of the cryospheric components. The present session invites contributions presenting global and regional assessments of mass-change estimates from the different cryospheric components and various sources, discussing lessons learned from existing intercomparison exercises such as the Ice Sheet Mass-Balance Intercomparison Exercise (www.imbie.org) or the Glacier Mass-Balance Intercomparison Exercise (www.glambie.org), and demonstrating the need for similar activities for the other cryosphere components.



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C08 Challenges in Modeling, Monitoring and Predicting Alpine Mass Movements

Convener(s): Johan Gaume (Switzerland)

Co-Convener(s): Jessica Much (Switzerland) Alessandro Cicoira (Switzerland) Julia Kowalski (Germany) Jan-Thomas Fischer (Austria) Alec van Herwijnen (Switzerland)

Description
Climate change is particularly affecting the high-mountain cryosphere, which includes glaciers, permafrost and snow. These changes affect the frequency and intensity of alpine mass movements, requiring updated risk management procedures and resilient mitigation measures. Such adaptation strategies would strongly benefit from a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanical processes at play, improved monitoring capabilities, and suitable and efficient modeling approaches. This session aims to improve our understanding of the crucial processes in the initiation and dynamics of alpine mass movements with the ultimate focus to improve prediction and mitigation measures. We thus welcome novel contributions related to the modeling, monitoring and prediction of alpine mass movements, including glacier and permafrost instabilities, snow/ice/rock avalanches and cascading processes such as glacial lake outburst floods. We propose to foster discussions around topics including (but not limited to) constitutive and rheological models, depth-averaged and particle-based methods, model parameter estimation, event detection and monitoring, data-driven / machine learning approaches, surrogate models and uncertainty quantification. Concerning processes, of particular interest is the role of water in solid and/or liquid states on slope stability and flow rheology/mobility, entrainment of glacier ice or saturated sediments, liquefaction, interaction with obstacles, forests or mitigation structures.



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C09 Mountain Snow Cover Under Climate Change: From Past to Future

Convener(s): Wolfgang Schoener (Austria)

Co-Convener(s): Lijuan Ma (China) Shawn Marshall (Canada)

Description
Climate change has a significant impact on the amount and spatial and temporal distribution of snow cover in mountain regions across the globe. Several studies show that this response of snow cover to climate change in different mountain regions is not a simple effect of temperature change, but depends on several factors, such as geographical location (climate zone), latitude and regional atmospheric influences (e.g. interaction with synoptic-scale atmospheric flows). However, the observational capacities and process understanding of these interactions are very different for the individual mountain regions. Often there are inventories of snow cover changes designated as global (but excluding mountain regions), e.g. based on satellite data (ESA-GCW Snow-Watch, etc.), as well as numerous process studies and selected data for some mountain regions. Despite the great importance of snow in mountain regions, a comprehensive inventory of mountain snow cover on a global scale based on robust data is missing so far. Regional inventories are limited in particular to a few well-monitored mountain regions such as the US Rockies and the European Alps. Overcoming this research gap is a major motivation for the recently established Joint Body "Status of Mountain Snow Cover", as a joint effort of IACS, WMO and MRI. The aim of the session is to bring together the knowledge and experience of researchers from different mountain regions of the world working on climate change-induced changes in snow cover, to present the current state of knowledge and to identify research gaps. Given the overall importance of snow for ecology, the economy and human life in general, researchers from diverse and also interdisciplinary fields are called upon to contribute, and these are encouraged for all mountain regions of the world and using a wide variety of data sources and analytical methods.



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C10 Satellite-Derived Snow Cover Products and Their Applications in Hydrology

Convener(s): Ali Arslan (Finland)

Co-Convener(s): Zuhal Akyurek (Turkey) Carlo de Michele (Italy) Aynur Şensoy Şorman (Turkey) Matias Takala (Finland)

Description
Satellite-derived snow cover products are crucial because they provide aerial/spatial information. The satellite-derived snow cover products are used for flood forecasting in snow dominated basins for short or medium range forecasting periods. These are useful for planning and management of water resources, reservoir control in the sense of floods or droughts, and hydropower generation. Snow storage in terms of aerial coverage and snow water equivalent are highly important in support for decision making. With longer data records, these products also serve for climate change impact analyses in hydrology. In this session, we welcome presentations of all new, improved, and future satellite-derived snow products and their applications in hydrology.



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C11 Light Absorbing Particles on Snow and Ice

Convener(s): Maria Gritsevich (Finland)

Co-Convener(s): Marie Dumont (France) Outi Meinander (Finland) McKenzie Skiles (USA) Biagio Di Mauro (Italy) Pavla Dagsson Waldhauserova (Iceland)

Description
Light absorbing particles such as black carbon, volcanic ashes, mineral dust or algae modify the albedo of snow and ice. Consequently, the amount of solar radiation absorbed by snow or ice is increased, potentially accelerating melt and triggering potent feedbacks. This session invites any contribution related to light absorbing particles on snow and ice, be they related to the impacts of light absorbing particles, the transport or the deposition processes. This includes measurement studies at small or large scales as well as modelling studies.



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C12 Spotlighting Divergence: Climate Change Refugia Within Snow-Dominated Catchments and Where to Find Them

Convener(s): Alfonso Fernández (Chile)

Co-Convener(s): Mario Lillo (Chile) Deigo Rivera (Chile) Marcelo Somos-Valenzuela (Chile) Edilia Jacque (Chile) Ana Huaico (Chile)

Description
Under current rates of climate warming, glaciers and snow continue a rapid shrinkage almost everywhere. Most glacierized mountain areas are already showing the impacts of ice and snow loss on streamflow, hazards, tourism, and hydropower, among others. However, although fluctuations in temperature and precipitation are intrinsically linked to dynamics of mass loss and gain, there are several examples of mountain regions with similar size and elevation range, and located within broadly homogenous climatic regimes, that have shown differential climatic responses in recent decades. These seemingly anomalous climatic sensitivities can be linked to topographic constraints leading to particular hypsometric distributions. Collectively, these conditions may allow glaciers and snow to remain providing ecosystem functions even in the most extreme climatic scenarios. Under these circumstances, some snow-dominated watersheds may constitute climate change refugia in hydrological terms. In this session, we aim to attract studies that are looking at regional to local topoclimatic conditions controlling resistance to climate warming within snow-dominated catchments. Studies involving glacier-climate sensitivity, snow hydrology, debris-cover impact on the surface energy balance, paleoglacier extents, geomorphometry, and streamflow from glacierized environments are welcome. We expect to fuel a discussion on how to pinpoint locations most likely to host refugia under different climatic projections.



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C13 Data Driven Cryospheric Sciences: Machine Learning, Data Assimilation and Inverse Methods for the Cryosphere

Convener(s): Fabien Maussion (Austria)

Co-Convener(s): Jordi Bolibar (Netherlands) Celia Baumhoer (Germany) Hui Tang (Germany) Facu Sapienza (USA)

Description
The recent exponential increase in Earth observations together with important advances in data science and statistics/machine learning are opening the door to new ways of exploring and understanding physical processes and interactions within the cryosphere. These new tools have been used to exploit large remote sensing datasets for image segmentation, causal analysis, inverse methods, physics-informed learning and to design more efficient surrogate models. With the quick rise of all these approaches, there is a need to bring them together in a common space of discussion in order to track what progress has been made so far. With this in mind, in this session we welcome studies which combine novel data-driven efforts to better understand and quantify physical processes within the different subfields of the cryosphere. These include - but are not limited to - (i) computer vision studies focusing on image classification, (ii) inverse and physics-informed learning methods to better constrain and understand physical processes, (iii) pure data-driven methods to explore alternative modelling approaches, and (iv) surrogate models to accelerate simulations as well as new ways of exploring models (e.g. probabilistic methods).



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C14 Cryospheric Processes and Related Socioeconomic Impacts

Convener(s): Cunde Xiao (China)

Co-Convener(s): Wouter Buytaert (UK) Christian Huggel (Switzerland) Xiaoming Wang (Australia)

Description
Cryospheric Processes and Related Socioeconomic Impacts "Significant human populations live within or adjacent to polar and alpine regions. The cryosphere provides water resources that support irrigation, hydropower generation, and other economic benefits such as tourism. This symposium focuses on all aspects of “cryospheric impacts” that include both services (benefits that humanity gains from cryospheric systems) and hazards. We seek submissions including, but not limited to, the following topics:
- Services that are provisioned, regulated or supported by the cryosphere
- Hazards that are originated, connected or amplified by the cryosphere
- Cryospheric processes that influence the above services and hazards
- Changes in the cryosphere including tipping points or thresholds that may result in putting services at risk, and/or cascading hazards
- Methods or assessments of the social and/or economic value of cryospheric services. "



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C15 Progress in Quantifying Ice-Sheet Surface Mass Balance: Past, Present and Future

Convener(s): Cécile Agosta (France)

Co-Convener(s): Miren Vizcaino (Netherlands) Yetang Wang (China)

Description
"We focus on the surface mass balance (SMB) of ice-sheets, including individual mass balance components, feedbacks and associated uncertainties, and advancing process understanding from models (regional and global) and/or observations (ground-based and remote). Topics include but are not limited to
- Quantification of ice-sheet SMB and its uncertainties for paleoclimate and the recent past (1850-present) including melt, runoff, sublimation, refreezing, and snow accumulation.
- Advances in the understanding of key processes relevant for surface mass fluxes, including for example, surface and firn hydrology, drifting snow, and the effect of impurities on melt
- Quantification of feedbacks between ice sheet SMB and components of the climate system at decadal to centennial time scales, including mass balance/elevation feedbacks, linkages to sea surface conditions, and impacts of storm tracks and large-scale circulation patterns.
- Projections of ice sheet SMB for the next decades to the next few centuries and beyond, and associated uncertainties, from regional and global climate models. "



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JOINT



JA02 Data Assimilation and Statistical Learning in Earth and Space Sciences (IAGA, IACS, IAHS, IAMAS, IASPEI)

Convener(s): Tomoko Matsuo (USA)

Co-Convener(s): Patricia de Rosnay (UK, IACS), Julien Aubert (France, IAGA), Larry Kepko (USA,IAGA), Salvatore Grimaldi (Italy, IAHS), Craig Bishop (Australia, IAMAS)

Description
This symposium will serve as a forum on the latest research and development in data assimilation and statistical learning across Earth and Space Science community. Data assimilation is a powerful statistical learning framework that combines models, observations, and their respective uncertainties, allowing us to unify data-driven scientific induction with first principle-based deductions. The framework in the general form can be applied to any geophysical system, providing the common ground for our forum. On the other hand, applications of data assimilation and statistical learning techniques to sparsely observed geophysical systems (such as the core, mantle, cryosphere, hydrosphere, thermosphere and ionosphere, and magnetosphere) face considerable challenges, requiring innovative adaptation of methods to maximize the use of sparse observations, and considerable research efforts to quantify model and observational uncertainties. This symposium solicits papers that address unique application challenges faced by different disciplines so that we can learn from each other and further our common interest in advancing data assimilation and statistical learning applications in the Earth and Space Sciences.



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JA03 Analogue Data for the Future: Preservation and Present-Day Utilization of Historical Data in the Geosciences (IAGA, IACS, IASPEI, IAHS, IAG, IAPSO)

Convener(s): Ciarán Beggan (UK, IAGA)

Co-Convener(s): Lauren Vargo (New Zealand, IACS), Kirsten Elger (Germany, IAG), Hisashi Hayakawa (Japan/UK, IAGA), Alberto Viglione (Italy, IAHS), Satheesh S.C. Shenoi (India, IAPSO), Josep Batlló Ortiz (Spain, IASPEI), Kristine Harper (Denmark, IAMAS), Roberto Carniel (Italy, IAVCEI)

Description
In many areas of geophysical and geological studies, long running measurements at a fixed location or over a wider region exist in analogue (physical) form including, amongst others, on photographic paper, in journals or as published tables. It is highly advantageous to convert analogue records to digital values, allowing modern computational techniques and analysis to be applied. However, it is often challenging to convert analogue records as formatting, the type of information recorded, accompanying metadata, and unit metrics change over time. Campaigns to digitize temperature or climate-related measurements have been very successful, especially with the recruitment of keen citizen scientists. However, more scientific formats, such as graphs with technical information or notation, are less amenable to generalist help. Historic analogue records frequently offer significant scientific implications, forming a baseline for analyses of long-term variability and/or short-term extreme hazards in multiple scientific aspects. In this context, it is important to compare these analogue records with one another and document their individual instrumental details for cross-calibrations. This session looks at methods for preservation, extraction, and analysis of historic analogue records, including by manual, image processing or machine learning techniques. This session also accommodates documentation of instrument detail and calibration methods for historical observations. This session welcomes new analyses using data that have previously been in analogue form, and case studies of long-term geophysical variability or individual short-term extreme events. We seek submissions from across all associations.



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JC01 Remote Sensing of the Cryosphere (IACS, IAHS)

Convener(s): Liss Andreassen (Norway, IACS)

Co-Convener(s): Stephan Paul (Germany, IACS), Melody Sandells (UK, IAHS), McKenzie Skiles (USA, IAHS)

Description
The number of aerial and satellite remote sensing platforms and sensors have grown significantly. New sensors open possibilities of using dense time series for exploring the cryosphere and to combine multiple data sources and processing large datasets. In this symposium we welcome presentations of remote sensing of all parts of the cryosphere including seasonal snow, sea ice, glaciers, permafrost, ice sheets and extra-terrestrial glaciology. Contributions that integrate remote sensing and field-based observations to investigate spatial and temporal changes in cold regions are encouraged as well as novel use of remote sensing data to understand processes or support modelling of the cryosphere.



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JC02 Declining Glacier, Snow Cover and Permafrost and Their Impacts on Downstream Hydrology (IACS, IAHS, IAG)

Convener(s): Regine Hock (Norway, IACS)

Co-Convener(s): Wei Feng (China, IAG), James McPhee (Chile/USA, IAHS), Anna-Marie Jörss (IAHS, Germany)

Description
With ongoing climate change, significant changes in the hydrological regime and biogeochemical properties of streams are expected in catchments where glaciers, permafrost or snow cover exist. This symposium focuses on new insights into relevant processes, new observational evidence of ongoing changes, as well as advances in our ability to model future runoff in ice and snow-covered basins on all scales from the local to the global scale. Topics include but are not limited to (a) the impacts of glacier, permafrost and snow cover changes on runoff amounts and seasonality, physical and biogeochemical properties of stream water, and hydrological pathways, (b) trends in river runoff in glacier-, permafrost- and snow-affected catchments and their causes, and (c) snow-permafrost-glacier-climate-runoff feedbacks and related physical processes, including the effects of black carbon/aerosols and changing atmospheric drivers on melt runoff and geophysical risks.



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JC03 Coupling Processes Between the Atmospheric Boundary-Layer and Snow - Ice Surfaces: Modelling at Convection and Snowdrift-Permitting Scales (IACS, IAHS, IAMAS)

Convener(s): Richard Essery (UK,IACS)

Co-Convener(s): Vincent Vionnet (Canada, IACS), Tobias Jonas (Switzerland, IAHS), Rebecca Mott (Switzerland, IAMAS)

Description
This symposium addresses fundamental exchange mechanisms of mass and energy between the cryosphere and the atmospheric boundary layer in snow and ice covered regions. The interaction between the near-surface atmosphere and the cryosphere can lead to significant spatial and temporal variations of momentum, mass and energy exchanges as well as complex atmospheric flow patterns modulated by complexities in topography. These processes strongly affect the evolution of seasonal snow cover, permafrost and glaciers, and drive snow and ice hydrology. Moves towards convection-permitting scales in numerical weather prediction have also brought benefits for resolving atmospheric flows and precipitation in mountainous topography, but coupled modelling at smaller “snowdrift-permitting” scales for which there can be significant redistribution of snow between model grid cells has not yet been so widely investigated. We invite contributions on, but not limited to, the following topics: modelling of turbulent fluxes to snow and ice surfaces in stable boundary layers; advection of energy to snow cover and glaciers, and impacts on snow and ice melt; orographically-induced precipitation and preferential deposition of snowfall; wind-induced snow transport and associated sublimation. Studies in level and mountainous terrains are welcome. We particularly encourage abstracts that propose advances in modelling techniques to represent the physics of coupling the atmospheric boundary layer to snow and ice surfaces, and in applications of high-resolution snow and ice mass balance modelling.



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JC04 Atmospheric Circulations and Surface Mass Balance of Ice Sheets (IACS, IAMAS)

Convener(s): Charles Amory (France, IACS)

Co-Convener(s): Christoph Kittel (Belgium, IACS), Anais Orsi (Canada, IACS), Irina Gorodetskaya (Portugal, IAMAS)

Description
Atmospheric circulations in high latitudes strongly influence the surface mass and energy balances of ice sheets through transport of heat, moisture and momentum. While our ability to simulate their occurrences is improving, uncertainties persist in their dynamical responses to climate change, linkages with multi-scale climate variability, and climatological impacts over ice sheets. Advancing our knowledge of the underlying dynamics is therefore crucial for reliable climate projections over ice sheets and for improved interpretations of ice core paleoclimate records. The objective of this session is to advance our understanding of atmospheric circulations in high-latitude regions and to analyse their impacts in past, present, and future climates. We welcome theoretical, observational and modeling contributions on atmospheric circulations such as blocking, atmospheric rivers, foehn and katabatic flows and their linkages to weather and climate extremes and surface mass balance of ice sheets.



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JC05 Atmosphere-Ocean-Sea Ice Interactions: Physical and Chemical Processes (IACS, IAMAS, IAPSO)

Convener(s): Takenobu Toyota (Japan, IACS), Xin Yang (UK, IAMAS)

Co-Convener(s): Kim Strong (Canada, IAMAS), David Tarasick (Canada, IAMAS), William Perrie (Canada, IAPSO)

Description
The rapid change of polar climate over the past several decades has significantly affected the atmosphere-ocean-sea ice (AOI) interface and thereby interactions such as the exchanges of energy and chemical compounds through physical and chemical processes. These processes are linked together via chemical compound and particle exchanges at air-snow interfaces, snow processes, polynya formation, sea-ice production and deep-water formation. AOI interactions can be triggered also by short-term synoptic and mesoscale weather phenomena such as cold air outbreaks, katabatic winds, and polar lows. Thus, changes in polar weather and meteorology may influence the natural processes involved in polar atmospheric chemistry. However, the representation of these physical and chemical processes and interactions at different spatial and temporal scales remains a major challenge for current weather and climate models. This symposium aims to brings together researchers working in the areas of atmospheric chemistry (Part I) and physics (Part II) to demonstrate their latest findings, highlight gaps in our understanding of the physical and chemical aspects of polar climate and the polar surface boundary layer, and inspire further investigation and collaboration. Part I focuses on but is not limited to: lower tropospheric oxidizing capacity; ozone; reactive halogens and nitrogen; mercury; snow chemistry on sea ice, tundra and ice sheets; sea salt aerosol from blowing snow; and particulate chemistry. Part II focuses on but is not limited to: atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers, sea ice and snow-cover processes as well as global change related to the marine Arctic and Antarctic. Further focus is on snow cover modelling, ablation and accumulation on sea ice; and processes or parameterizations of physical and chemical exchange, and transport, including the influence of sub-mesoscale ocean dynamics, where observational challenges can be addressed. Contributions dealing with theoretical and observational studies, remote sensing, or numerical modelling are welcome.



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JC06 Mountain Cryosphere Hazards (IACS, IAVCEI, IASPEI)

Convener(s): Holger Frey (Switzerland, IACS/GAPHAZ)

Co-Convener(s): Michele Koppes (Canada, IACS/GAPHAZ), Mylene Jacquemart (Switzerland, IACS/GAPHAZ), Fabian Walter (Switzerland, IASPEI), Roberto Sulpizio (Italy, IAVCEI)

Description
High mountains across the globe have been undergoing significant changes in natural hazards over the last few decades. Rapid warming has caused changes in the mountain cryosphere at unprecedented rates, affecting geomorphic processes beyond the ice, with significant impacts on landscapes and ecosystems. Cryospheric hazards are also undergoing rapid changes in mountains worldwide, often beyond historical precedence. Risks associated with all types of mass movements in mountain regions are increasing due to changes in the magnitude and frequency of hazards and increasing socio-economic development, which affects both exposure to and vulnerability of people and infrastructure. In this session, we invite contributions on all forms of hazards and risks from the mountain cryosphere, including avalanches, landslides, lake outbursts, volcano-ice interactions, earthquakes, permafrost thaw, debris flows, cascading process-chains, and impacts on mountain communities. We welcome case studies; theoretical and conceptual process models; mapping and modelling past, present and future hazards and risks; as well as aspects of disaster risk reduction and management. Contributions that also address the socio-economic drivers of risks are encouraged. 



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JG01 Interactions of the Solid Earth With Ice Sheets and Sea Level (IAG, IACS, IASPEI)

Convener(s): Rebekka Steffen (Sweden, IAG/IASPEI)

Co-Convener(s): Bert Wouters (Netherlands, IACS), Natalya Gomez (Canada, IAG/IACS), Lambert Caron (US, IAG), Doug Wiens (US, IASPEI)

Description
Measurements of solid Earth, sea-level and ice-sheet changes are influenced by a complex interaction of processes occurring over a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Present-day observations of solid Earth deformation in a given location are influenced by present and past changes in global surface loading, and these deformations play an important role in controlling ice-sheet changes in turn. Furthermore, observations that constrain past ice sheets are affected not only by glacial isostatic adjustment, but also by changing mantle dynamic topography and tectonic processes. In addition, applied geophysical investigations are revealing crucial spatial variations in Earth rheology, which again affect the deformation of the solid Earth. In this symposium, we showcase model- and data-driven efforts to understand feedbacks between surface load changes and the solid Earth over all timescales and observation types.
Topics covered by the Symposium:
- observations of mass changes in the cryosphere and oceans, and their interaction with solid Earth deformation
- influence of glacial isostatic adjustment on paleo and modern observations of sea level or ice sheet behavior
- seismicity induced by ice-mass and sea-level changes
- geophysical studies of the rheology of the solid Earth in the context of sea-level and ice-sheet studies

Solicited speakers: Tanghua Li (Earth Observatory of Singapore) and Terry Wilson (Ohio State University)

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JG05 Geodesy for Climate Research (IAG, IAMAS, IACS, IAPSO, IAHS)

Convener(s): Annette Eicker (Germany, IAG)

Co-Convener(s): Bert Wouters (Netherlands, IACS), John T Reager (USA, IAHS), Adam Scaife (UK, IAMAS), Benoit Meyssignac (France, IAPSO)

Description
This symposium is dedicated to the use of geodetic measuring techniques for innovative climate and Earth system studies. Modern geodetic observing systems document a wide range of changes in the Earth’s solid and fluid layers at very different spatial and temporal scales related to processes as, e.g., the terrestrial and atmospheric water cycle, ocean and atmosphere dynamics, sea level, ice-mass balance, and glacial isostatic adjustment. Different time spans of observations need to be cross-compared and combined to resolve a wide spectrum of climate-related signals. Geodetic observables are also often compared with geophysical models and climate models, which helps to explain observations, test theories, evaluate simulations, and finally merge measurements and numerical models via data assimilation. We appreciate contributions utilizing data from diverse geodetic observation techniques including altimetry and gravimetry satellites, navigation satellite systems, satellite radio occultation and reflectometry, InSAR, VLBI, tide gauges, or remote sensing. We welcome studies that cover a wide variety of applications of geodetic measurements and their combination to observe and model Earth system signals in hydrological, ocean, atmospheric, climate and cryospheric sciences. Any new approaches helping to separate and interpret the variety of geophysical signals are equally appreciated. Contributions working towards any of the goals of the Inter-Commission Committee on "Geodesy for Climate Research" (ICCC) of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) are very welcome in this symposium.



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JH01 New, Large, and Open Data for the Earth and Environmental Science Community (IAHS, IAPSO, IACS, IAGA, IASPEI)

Convener(s): Heidi Kreibich (Germany, IAHS)

Co-Convener(s): Charles Fierz (Switzerland, IACS), Masahito Nosé (Japan, IAGA), Elena Tel Pérez (Spain, IAPSO), Florian Haslinger (Switzerland, IASPEI)

Description
Data is essential for understanding, modeling and managing earth and environmental processes, their interactions and their dynamics. Therefore, the acquisition, management and use of data is a central component of all earth and environmental sciences. New data sources and advanced monitoring methods, including new sensors and instruments on the ground, at sea and in the air, web crawling technology and citizen science, as well as the strong trend towards open data and data sharing, open up fantastic opportunities but also bring challenges. There are concerns, for example, about ensuring and appropriately documenting data quality in particular with respect to ‘new data’, as well as about creating sufficient incentives for monitoring, data sharing and monitoring downstream usage (attribution) with persistent identifiers, or about adequate long-term curation of raw data and derived products. The aim of this symposium is to present and discuss new opportunities, but also challenges of these developments. We want to learn from each other how to support and implement the UNESCO recommendation for open science, the WMO Unified Data Policy, and the IOC/IODE recommendations in the framework of the UN Ocean Decade. For example, issuing and managing persistent identifiers throughout the data lifecycle, building FAIR and CAREful 'open' services, enforcing proper citation, are approaches that help achieving the vision of FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) and CARE (Collective benefit, Authority to control, Responsibility and Ethics) data that support quality action and research in the open science environment.



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JH02 Advances in Snow Hydrology (IAHS, IACS)

Convener(s): Timothy Link (USA, IAHS)

Co-Convener(s): Richard Essery (UK,IACS), Anna-Marie Jörss (IAHS, Germany)

Description
The storage and release of water from seasonal snowcovers constitutes a critical component of the annual hydrological cycle in many parts of the world. Quantifying, understanding, and predicting the processes that control snow distribution and ablation dynamics provide ample research challenges, especially in complex mountainous terrain. The spatial distribution of snowcover and its physical properties is highly variable at site to regional scales. Its dynamics are influenced by surrounding topography and vegetation that control accumulation and redistribution processes, as well as local micrometerological conditions that control snowcover energetics and ablation. Accurate measurement and modelling of snowcovers requires methods to assess variations in patterns and processes that act and interact at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Advances in these areas are needed and relevant to develop improved tools for scientists and managers concerned with floods, droughts, water supply, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, and the water-energy nexus in a changing climate. This session will bring together experimental and modeling experts to address recent research in snow hydrology. We especially encourage contributions related to topics such as: - Novel measurement approaches for snowpack states and fluxes - Feedbacks between climatic and snow hydrological processes and patterns - Snow-vegetation interactions in complex terrain - Effects of climate variability and change, especially in the rain-snow transition zone - Interactive effects of changing snow regimes and land cover patterns - Dynamics of the water-energy nexus in snow-dominated watersheds - Representation of small-scale variability in large scale modeling applications - Advances in modeling, including operational applications.



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JH03 Snow in the Critical Zone (IAHS, IACS)

Convener(s): McKenzie Skiles (USA, IAHS)

Co-Convener(s): Marie Dumont (France, IACS), Maria Jose Polo (Spain, IAHS), Richard Petrone (Canada, IAHS)

Description
In high elevation and high latitude environments snow plays an important role in the critical zone, the layer of Earth where fresh water flows and life exists. In regions where snow accumulates seasonally the temporal patterns of snow storage are intricately linked with phenology, and snowmelt is often the dominant source of streamflow generation and groundwater recharge that sustains ecological systems. Ecosystems that store snow, and those downstream that rely on the consistent timing and magnitude of snowmelt, are vulnerable to less and more variable snow cover in response to a warming climate. These systems are also at risk from rapid change due to disturbance events, such as forest fires or insect infestation, which are increasing in frequency and have long term implications for ecosystem function. This symposium welcomes all submissions that observe or simulate snow-ecosystem interactions and aim to better characterize the role of snow and meltwater hydrology in the critical zone. For example, studies of snow melt partitioning and storage, snow-vegetation interaction, and how snow and snow dominated systems are being impacted by, and responding to, change and disturbance.



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JH04 Anthropocene: Perspectives From and Within Geophysics (IAHS, IAMAS, IACS, IASPEI, IAVCEI, IAG, IAPSO)

Convener(s): Christophe Cudennec (France, IAHS)

Co-Convener(s): Richard Essery (UK,IACS), Melita Keywood (Australia, IAMAS/iCACGP), Mark Lawrence (Germany, IAMAS/iCACGP), Domenico Giardini (Switzerland, IASPEI), Roberto Sulpizio (Italy, IAVCEI), Catia Domingues (UK, IAPSO)

Description

As the International Union of Geological Sciences considers the Anthropocene from a stratigraphic perspective, and as other communities are considering a wider definition (see the ICSU-ICS intermediate synthesis in 2016, https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/global-environmental-change/vol/39/suppl/C) IUGG has to reconsider the concept and to renew its contribution. This session welcomes any communication in that perspective, including about great acceleration, planetary boundaries, change detection and attribution, climate change and other changes to the atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere-hydrosphere system, such as erosion-sedimentation, man-induced seismicity and man-driven geomorphology, along with related farther-reaching topics such as One Health; and assessing these issues and science-informed policy options for mitigation and adaptation together with the socio-geosciences.





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JH05 Citizen Science, Crowdsourcing and Innovative Monitoring for Advancing Geo-Sciences (IAHS, IASPEI, IAGA, IACS, IAMAS)

Convener(s): Fernando Nardi (Italy, IAHS)

Co-Convener(s): Ryan Crumley (USA, IACS), Manoj Nair (USA, IAGA), Thomas Spengler (Norway, IAMAS), Rémy Bossu (France, IASPEI)

Description
Citizen involvement in science has been transformed in the last decade by new and widely accessible data acquisition and processing tools as well as by pervasive low-cost and portable technology. Geospatial technologies and affordable equipment (smart phones, cameras, drones, etc.) allow students, researchers, and citizens to gather, analyze, visualize, and share a wealth of earth system data at different spatial and temporal scales. New opportunities are, thus, arising for addressing the uncertainties and inaccuracies of geophysical models and risk management within different fields, for a better understanding, monitoring, and forecasting of geophysical extremes. Citizen science is supporting a new paradigm for geosciences, where active citizens and crowdsourcing of data have a pivotal role for risk mitigation, communication, and awareness. This transition requires multi-disciplinary and trans-sectoral knowledge, analytical approaches, and data processing methods, spanning from earth-, geo-, hydro-, cryo- sciences to humanities as well as social and communication sciences, to synergistically define the guidelines and procedures that support effective use of human-sensed data. A key challenge in using citizen-science data is the significant noise content in the data collected by untrained users. Recent advances in Machine-Learning (ML) could allow us to build noise-filtering algorithms that can take advantage of high volumes of data created by citizen-science projects.  In this framework, the use of unintended technology along with do-it-yourself and low cost equipment is opening novel observational avenues. This joint symposium seeks contributions on data, tools, methods, and procedures that explore the role, value, and performances of citizen science and innovative sensing for earth science research.



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JH06 Education & Outreach in Geosciences (IAHS, IASPEI, IAGA, IAG, IAVCEI, IACS, IAMAS, IAPSO)

Convener(s): Christophe Cudennec (France, IAHS)

Co-Convener(s): Fabien Maussion (Austria, IACS), Markku Poutanen (Finland, IAG), Katia Pinheiro (Brasil, IAGA), Tereza Kameníková (Czech Republic, IAGA), Thomas Spengler (Norway, IAMAS), Angela Pomaro (Italy, IAPSO), Raju Sarkar (Bhutan, IASPEI), Natalia Pardo (Colombia, IAVCEI)

Description
Sharing scientific knowledge and methods through education and outreach is of high importance to support the societal transition in terms of sustainability, development, and security. Initial and life-long education, training in operational services, and capacity development within institutions and society are facing many challenges, when dealing with environmental and societal changes, disaster risk reduction, and the evolution of techniques along the data – information – knowledge – decision support chain. This symposium welcomes conceptual developments as well as practical study cases from geoscientists, as well as from didacticians and knowledge brokers. The variety of approaches across disciplines and across the diversity of the geosciences will provide a collective overview on education and outreach activities the basics and variants in our fields. The symposium also encourages sharing of lessons learned from the enhanced digitization induced by the pandemic and from the ongoing digital revolution, showcasing perspectives of the knowledge society and the Open Science paradigm.



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JM01 Recent Advances in Regional Climate Modelling (IAMAS, IACS, IAHS)

Convener(s): Tomas Halenka (Czech Republic, IAMAS)

Co-Convener(s): Sven Kotlarski (Switzerland, IACS), Erika Coppola (Italy, IAHS)

Description
Regional climate models (RCMs) are important tools which can be used not only for dynamical downscaling of global climate models (GCMs) but for the analysis of a broad spectrum of problems, e.g. in land surface interaction, cloud processes, atmospheric chemistry and many other purposes. These also include hydrological and cryospheric applications, acknowledging the fact that due to their interactive role in the climate system sophisticated representations of the terrestrial hydrology and the terrestrial cryosphere are incorporated in today's state-of-the-art climate models. A recent trend in RCM development concerns the increase of the spatial resolution, shifting from a few tens towards just a few kilometers. This so-called convection-permitting mode enables the explicit representation of small scale features such as convective precipitation extremes or specific climate features in complex topography. However, this approach is very demanding in terms of computational resources, which requires specific developments in IT and high-performance computing. These challenges already lead to broader cooperations between modelling groups (e.g., CORDEX). These collaborations, in turn, are able to provide larger ensembles for certain regions of interest with a decent coverage of projection uncertainty. In general, high-resolution simulations from RCMs can significantly improve the applicability for climate change impacts assessment - including impacts on the terrestrial hydrology and cryosphere - and for further climate services and the development of adaptation strategies. Contributions addressing all these above mentioned aspects as well as broader regional climate modelling science are welcome to be submitted for this session.



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JM02 Tropical-Polar Interactions, Arctic Amplification and Its Influence on Midlatitude Weather (IAMAS, IACS, IAPSO)

Convener(s): Xichen Li (China, IAMAS)

Co-Convener(s): Anais Orsi (Canada, IACS), Lee Welhouse (USA, IAMAS), Sheeba Nettukandy Chenoli (Malaysia, IAMAS), Jonathan Wille (USA, IAMAS), Matthew England (Australia, IAPSO)

Description
The Earth’s tropical and polar regions are not isolated climate systems and are in a constant cycle of feedback regarding heat, moisture, and momentum exchanges. The interactions between polar regions and lower latitudes play a crucial role in the earth climate system. On the other hand, Arctic and Antarctic experienced dramatic climate changes in recent decades. The surface temperature trend over the Arctic is more than twice as fast as the global warming rate, associated with a rapid Arctic sea-ice retreat, which is known as the Arctic Amplification. Rapid Arctic changes contribute to a series of climate changes in mid-latitudes. This symposium invites discussions on the rapid climate changes over the Arctic and Antarctic regions and their impacts on lower latitudes, as well as the teleconnections between tropics/mid-latitudes and the polar regions and resulting impacts on the polar atmosphere-ocean-sea ice system. An understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric pathways of the tropical-polar interaction is essential for both short-term and seasonal forecasting along with calibrating future climate change projections. The Arctic amplification has broad implications on the cold winter over the Eurasian continent and extreme weather events over the Northern Hemisphere during both winter and summer. These will be the main focus of this symposium. Topics of discussion welcomed in this symposium include any studies that connect the lower latitudes and the higher latitudes such as empirical and modelling approaches to Rossby wave and jet stream dynamics, stratosphere-troposphere coupling, meridional moisture transport, ocean-atmospheric linkages, and how these processes impact the earth climate system in the past, present, and future. If a butterfly flaps its wings in the tropics or polar regions, can we model its impacts in the Arctic and Antarctic or lower latitudes?



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JM03 Polar Regions Instrumentation (IAMAS, IACS, IASPEI)

Convener(s): Tracy Moffat-Griffin (United Kingdom, IAMAS)

Co-Convener(s): Alexis Berne (Switzerland, IACS), Matthew Lazzara (USA, IAMAS), Adam T. Ringler (USA, IASPEI)

Description
There are many ways to study and characterize the atmosphere, from the use of ground-based instrumentation and balloons to satellite observations. This symposium welcomes submissions that cover different atmospheric instrument approaches to studying the depth of the polar atmosphere: the surface, the troposphere and beyond. New atmospheric instrumentation and their results, new analysis techniques or planned projects/observational research campaigns will be highlighted. Observational studies that feature polar instrumentation applications are also encouraged in this symposium.



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JM05 Earth System Models: Assessing the Earth System’s State and Fate From Regional to Planetary Scales (IAMAS, IAHS, IACS, IAPSO, IAVCEI?)

Convener(s): François Massonnet (Belgium, IAMAS)

Co-Convener(s): Sophie Nowicki (USA, IACS), Richard Petrone (Canada, IAHS), Anna von der Heydt (Netherlands, IAPSO)

Description
Earth System Models (ESMs) have become a cornerstone in geosciences, being used for process understanding, detection and attribution of climate signals, prediction from sub-seasonal to millennial time scales, regional downscaling, and impact analyses. Each generation of ESMs presents refinements compared to the previous one: from one cycle of model development to the next, spatial resolution increases, more components of the Earth system are included, and new processes become explicitly represented. Also, observations and data-driven approaches are increasingly used within ESMs to better predict high-impact events. This symposium encourages contributions dealing with the many facets of Earth System Model development, evaluation, and application, including but not limited to: modeling results from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6, development and assessment of models making use of recent Earth observations from ground- and space-based measurements, prediction of climate on seasonal to centennial timescales, climate change detection and attribution, regional-scale climate modeling and process analysis, high-resolution climate modeling, and subgrid scale parameterization development including statistical and machine learning techniques. Submissions on the latest advances in coupled aspects of the Earth system are particularly encouraged.



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JP02 Arctic Ocean Physics and Biochemistry in a Changing Climate (IAPSO, IACS)

Convener(s): Agatha de Boer (Sweden, IAPSO)

Co-Convener(s): Martin Vancoppenolle (France, IACS), Sheldon Bacon (UK, IAPSO), Igor Polyakov (USA, IAPSO), Zoe Koening (Norway, IAPSO)

Description
The United Nations declared Climate Change as the defining challenge of our time. The most vulnerable region on Earth is the Arctic, which is warming at double the global mean rate. Given the Arctic’s frontline importance, a large scientific investment has recently been made to understand and predict the Arctic Ocean’s heat content, freshwater content, and its sea-ice state. Arctic modelling efforts have been improved and new observations have been added from ship data, moorings, and satellites. Nevertheless, models have difficulty to simulate the Arctic’s climate state - simulations of the sea ice cover in recent decades tend to underestimate the observed rapid decline and predictions of when the Arctic will be ice-free vary widely. In order to meet the challenges of the future, we may need to accelerate progress by true trans-disciplinary science. Thus, we invite abstracts covering observations, theory, and modelling of the physics and biochemistry of the ocean and sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and its neighbouring seas. Abstracts are also encouraged across a large time frame, from past Arctic Ocean states, to the present state, as well as predictions of the future. Abstract that cover more than one of these aspects are particularly welcome.

Solicited speakers: Dirk Notz (University of Hamburg, Germany), Celine Heuze (Gothenburg University, Sweden), Marie Louise Timmermans (Yale University, USA)

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JP03 Physical and Biogeochemical Ocean and Ice Processes in the Southern Ocean: Observations, State Estimation and Modeling (IAPSO, IACS)

Convener(s): Joellen L. Russel (USA, IAPSO)

Co-Convener(s): Martin Vancoppenolle (France, IACS), Adele Morrison (Australia, IAPSO), Ilana Wainer (Brazil, IAPSO)

Description
Quantification and simulation of the physical and biogeochemical processes that determine the Southern Ocean and its ice cover’s mean state, variability, and response to external forcing are critical to our understanding of the climate system as a whole, and for reducing uncertainties in climate projections. Advances in data collection, state estimation and modeling capabilities have finally established the necessary infrastructure to permit a deeper understanding of the Southern Ocean’s processes that are relevant to climate. This session will present new results based on modeling and/or observational efforts that investigate ocean and ice processes in the Southern Ocean, in terms of physical and biogeochemical processes, as well as ocean-ice-atmosphere interactions.



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JP04 Ice Sheet-Ocean Interactions: Challenges and Insights From Theory, Observations and Modelling (IAPSO, IACS, IASPEI)

Convener(s): Felicity McCormack (Australia, IAPSO), Isabel Nias (UK, IACS)

Co-Convener(s): Donald Slater (UK, IACS), Sue Cook (Australia, IACS), Yoshihiro Nakayama (Japan, IAPSO), Helene Seroussi (USA, IACS/IAPSO), Rick Aster (USA, IASPEI)

Description
Ocean-driven melting of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets is accelerating and is a key process contributing to the significant uncertainty associated with estimates of future sea level rise. Ice sheet-ocean interactions range across spatial scales: from the microscale processes governing melt at the ice-ocean boundary layer, through the buoyancy-driven circulation beneath ice shelves and at tidewater glaciers, to large-scale fjord and open ocean circulation patterns; and across a range of timescales: in response to seasonal fluctuations in warm water supply to the ice-ocean front to multi-decadal and centennial oscillations in response to intrinsic ice and ocean dynamic processes. This symposium brings together researchers working in the areas of interactions between ice sheets, ice shelves, tidewater glaciers, icebergs, and the ocean, and covering a range of spatial and temporal scales that are relevant to ocean-driven melting of ice. The session will cover theoretical, observational, and modelling disciplines. Studies that offer new insights and technologies to improve understanding of ice-ocean interactions are particularly welcomed.



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JP06 Electromagnetic Studies of the Ice and Ocean System (IAPSO, IACS, IAGA)

Convener(s): Jan Saynisch-Wagner (Germany, IAPSO)

Co-Convener(s): Kenichi Matsuoka (Norway, IACS), Ingo Wardinski (France, IAGA), Neesha R. Schnepf (USA, IAGA), Graham Hill (Czech Republic, IAGA), Christopher Irrgang (Germany, IAPSO)

Description
Electromagnetic signals are sensitive to a wide range of oceanographic and cryospheric system properties, e.g., salinity, temperature, aggregate state, velocity or transport. Electromagnetic observations come from a range of sources: stationary magnetometer observatories providing long time series of data; tracks from ships, gliders, buoys, or planes; measurement expeditions; ocean bottom magnetometers; and observations from passive deep sea telecommunication cables. The session invites studies that utilize the available data to infer information about the state of, or changes in, the ocean-cryosphere system. In addition, we invite numerical or theoretical studies that focus on the respective sensitivities.



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JS01 Cryoseismology (IASPEI, IACS, IAG)

Convener(s): Andreas Köhler (Norway, IASPEI)

Co-Convener(s): Alex Brisbourne (UK, IACS), Bernd Kulessa (UK, IACS), Mirko Scheinert (Germany, IAG), Masaki Kanao (Japan, IASPEI)

Description
The cryosphere, comprising the Earth’s glaciers, ice sheets, sea ice, permafrost, and snowpack, is undergoing rapid change in a warming climate. However, our understanding of the processes governing these changes is hindered by a lack of observations with sufficient temporal and spatial resolution in these generally remote and often inaccessible environments. Fortunately, many of the cryospheric processes of interest produce ground vibrations or cause variations in the seismic wave propagation properties. Analysis of these seismic signals and ground changes can yield essential insight into the relationship between environmental forcing and the response of ocean - cryosphere - solid earth systems. For example, impulsive events with small magnitudes (icequakes) and larger teleseismically detected glacial earthquakes can be generated by dynamic glacial processes such as calving or basal slip. Furthermore, ambient seismic noise interferometry allows us to monitor seasonal and long-term changes in permafrost, ice bodies, and the solid earth below ice sheets and glaciers. Continuous study of temporal and spatial variability of these processes improves our understanding of the cryosphere’s response to climate change. In this joint symposium between IASPEI and IACS, we invite submissions which cover the full gamut of “cryoseismology”. We encourage contributions treating the observation and modeling of seismic signals involving dynamics of ice sheets, sea ice, icebergs and glaciers, as well as changes to the thermal and physical structure of permafrost and snow. We invite submissions on case studies, development of survey techniques, advances in the processing, integration with other geophysical methods or in-situ observations, as well as new technologies such as distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) with fiber optics.

Solicited speaker: Fabian Walter (Switzerland)

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JV01 Volcano-Ice Interactions (IAVCEI, IACS)

Convener(s): Shaun Eaves (New Zealand, IACS)

Co-Convener(s): Rosie Cole (New Zealand, IAVCEI)

Description
Interactions between volcanism and the cryosphere are important parts of the evolution of Earth and other planets. Eruptions that occurred beneath glaciers and ice sheets have produced distinctive geological features that yield insight to volcanic hazards or constraint of past glacier extent and palaeoenvironment. Glaciovolcanism is rarely observed directly, thus the knowledge base of this nascent field is largely restricted to information gleaned from the geological record. More recently, these observations have been supplemented with laboratory experiments and monitoring surveys that offer exciting potential to explore the physical parameters of glaciovolcanic processes. This joint-commission symposium aims to promote the interdisciplinary interaction between volcanologists and glaciologists with shared interests in glaciovolcanism. We invite contributions including, but not limited to: i) Field-based observations and interpretations of glaciovolcanic products and processes; ii) Experimental studies concerning the interaction between lava or pyroclasts with ice; iii) Glaciological observations and/or numerical modelling that concern volcanic influences on glacier mass balance or ice flow; iv) Palaeoglaciological studies from volcanic domains; v) Studies of causative links between deglaciation and volcanism; vi) Investigations that address climate and environmental change through glaciovolcanic studies; vii) Monitoring and mitigation of the hazards associated with ice-covered volcanoes on Earth; vii) Investigations aimed at understanding the signals generated by ice-covered volcanoes



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